Houston Historic Districts: Houston Heights South Historic District

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It’s been awhile since I’ve posted. I’ve been traveling and working, celebrating holidays. I’ve even started writing some fiction in my free time. All of the usual excuses of those who fall behind on their blogging.

Continuing on into the Heights South Historic District. Whereas the West Heights is my idea of the prototypical Heights neighborhood, the South Heights has a surprising number of larger Victorian houses.

 

Enjoy the photos!

Houston Historic Districts: Houston Heights West Historic District

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I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving. I was visiting family in Ohio, where it was most certainly not 70 degrees. Now that I’m home again, it’s back to reality. But you know what that means for you? More blogs!

We’re moving our tour of Houston historic districts to the Heights now. Unlike the Boulevard Oaks area districts I’ve written about the past few weeks  (here, here, here, and here), the Heights isn’t known for large mansions.

Developed in 1891 as a suburb, the Heights got its name for its elevation 23 feet higher than that of the city. One of America’s oldest planned communities, the Heights didn’t become part of Houston until 1918. Many of the neighborhood’s signature bungalow homes remain to this day, and it’s common to see homeowners in the Heights either renovate their houses in the original style or build new in the style. You’ll also notice Victorian-style homes, as well as many historic churches, commercial buildings, firehouses, and other structures. The Heights, quirky and village-like, is the poster child for Houston gentrification.

Next week I’ll continue touring the Heights, moving into the area’s five other designated historic districts.

 

Houston Historic Districts: Shadow Lawn

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Shadow Lawn is one of the smallest historic districts in the Houston area. It is, in fact, one street, a circle comprising only fourteen houses, adjacent to Bissonnet. Built in the early 1920s by some of Houston’s best architects, Shadow Lawn is home to an array of architectural styles.

Situated just north of Rice University and only steps from the Museum District, Shadow Lawn is right in the heart of Houston’s cultural scene. It’s also just blocks from Montrose, one of 2009’s “10 Greatest Places in America” .

This is one of those neighborhoods that’s worth a quick drive around if you’re passing through the Museum District. It won’t take more than a minute, but you’ll see some wonderful houses on your way.